Gender and livelihoods impacts of clean cookstoves in South Asia

Women spend approximately 374 hours every year collecting firewood in India finds this new study released by Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. It focuses on the gender impacts of clean cooking solutions in households as well as women's involvement in improved cookstoves markets, in India, Bangladesh and Nepal.

The Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves has released a study, conducted in partnership with Practical Action, on the gender impacts of clean cooking solutions in households, as well as women's involvement in improved cookstoves markets, in India, Bangladesh and Nepal. The study focuses on improved biomass cookstoves but also analyzes the use of other cooking solutions, such as kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG).

The study, titled ‘Gender and Livelihoods Impacts of Clean Cookstoves in South Asia,' concludes that women who use cleaner, more efficient cookstoves spend 70 fewer hours per year collecting fuelwood and use less fuel than those using traditional stoves. Key findings include: women spend approximately 374 hours every year collecting firewood in India; female-headed households are more likely to adopt cleaner cooking solutions than male-headed households; and women who are part of social groups are more likely to own an improved cookstove. The study also finds that women spend four hours a day cooking with traditional stoves, and can save one hour and 10 minutes when using a clean cookstove; and that children from households with clean cookstoves spend more time in school.

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