Rethinking power sector reform in the Developing World

During the 1990s, a new paradigm for power sector reform was put forward that emphasized the restructuring of utilities, the creation of regulators, the participation of the private sector, and the establishment of competitive power markets. Twenty-five years later, only a handful of developing countries have fully implemented these Washington Consensus policies. Across the developing world, reforms were adopted rather selectively, resulting in a hybrid model in which elements of market orientation coexist with continued state dominance of the sector. This book aims to revisit and refresh the thinking on power sector reform approaches for developing countries. The approach relies heavily on evidence from the past, drawing both on broad global trends and deep case material from 15 developing countries. It is also forward booking, considering the implications of new social and environmental policy goals, as well as emerging technological disruptions.

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